What We’re Reading, Week of 4/5

Posted: April 9, 2010 in Highlights

Network World…
Data Loss a Mystery for Many Companies
This article by Tim Greene says that even with increasing awareness of penalties and the damage that losing personal data can do to corporate reputations, network security executives are less convinced that they can figure out if personal data has been compromised when corporate laptops are lost or stolen. Last year, when TheInfoPro asked security professionals about data loss—40% said they could not determine if personally identifiable information (PII) was lost in cases of missing laptops. A few months later, this number increased to 59%. In yesterday’s blog post, we mentioned the importance of implementing proper security policies, such as the use of VPNs and two factor authentications to protect data.

Insecure about Security…
Mobile Device Security Woes
Jon Oltsik looks at a recent article that says large organizations now realize that endpoint security and management extends beyond PCs to mobile devices. According to a recent ESG survey, the top 5 security technologies for mobile device protection are device encryption, device firewall, strong authentication, anti-virus/anti-spam and device locking. Organizations looking to manage mobile device and PC/laptop security with common tools and processes were interviewed—70% of the organizations said that these are managed by the same group within IT. Jon assumes the organizations will want to address new security concerns with established tools and processes rather than start over again.

IT Business Edge…
Endpoint Security Concerns Remain High
Sue Marquette Poremba discusses how with laptops, netbooks, smartphones, portable hard drives and other multiple devices, developing a good security plan can be a complex project. The problem becomes more complicated by adding in the layers of security necessary for different devices and different users. She says emerging technologies will keep a focus on the increasing need and challenges of instituting endpoint security.

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