Posts Tagged ‘Mobile Security’

This is Part Two of our February Feature of the Month series. Last week, we honored the all-new Access Point Name (APN) feature in NCP’s entry and enterprise IPsec VPN clients.

Enterprises today are facing significant challenges related to remote computing due to their increasingly fragmented geographies. For instance, companies are not only contending with how to enable automated roaming between their solutions on premises and remote hotspots, but they are also responsible for making sure this seamless roaming is secure for employees working off-site.

To meet these industry needs, NCP engineering has enhanced its client suite to support integrated 3G cards, which ensure secure network connections for mobile workers when used in conjunction with the NCP Secure Enterprise VPN Server. NCP has combined 3G / 4G and VPN connection setup into a single, graphical user interface, simplifying the installation and deployment processes for both IT personnel and individual users.

Additionally, the NCP Secure Enterprise Client allows devices to automatically transition between a variety of communication mediums, including Wi-Fi, xDSL, LAN, ISDN and WWAN, making it easy for users to connect to their corporate networks from any location. Since the solution dynamically redirects the VPN tunnel without disrupting mobile computing sessions, employees are guaranteed uninterrupted connections to their networks.

Beyond that, for enhanced protection, the solution automatically recognizes secure and insecure networks to connect to while users are roaming. With its Friendly Net Detection feature, the IPsec VPN client then activates the appropriate firewall and security policies without the end user needing to lift a finger.

Want to learn more about the NCP Secure Enterprise Client’s integrated support of 3G / LTE cards? Additional information can be found here. 

*Editor’s Note: This column originally appeared in TechTarget’s SearchNetworking.com 

By Rainer Enders, CTO, Americas, NCP engineering

Both systems can enhance mobile device security at different levels. Typically, a mobile device management system provides for standard device management features such as configuration management, backup capabilities and remote wipe, along with logging and reporting. The enterprise application store provides for the capability to safely test and deploy chosen applications. As such, the company has greater control over the mobile device application environment. It can ensure the integrity and security of the applications as well as deliver a better user experience along with greater productivity. Meanwhile, enterprise application stores can be a particular advantage for heterogeneous device platforms.

 

Rainer Enders, CTO, Americas at NCP engineering, recently conducted an Execsense webinar around what CIOs and CTOs need to know about mobile device security. Rainer explains how the replacement of static access networks with mobile access networks has led to a paradigm shift in overall network security. Because mobile device protection complements infrastructure protection, enterprises must safeguard their data within hostile mobile access networks, which are made all the more vulnerable in today’s information age.

Taking us further down this journey of murky data classification and the new obstacles IT leaders face with the proliferation of mobile devices and BYOD, Rainer describes what mobile-centric security strategies CIOs and CTOs should implement to ensure optimal network protection. We hope you’ll tune in to the new Execsense webinar here.

 

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LinuxInsider – It’s Not You, Android – It’s Your Apps
Network WorldGartner: Mobile Device management tech set to take off
InformationWeekWindows 8: A Win for Enterprise Security
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