Posts Tagged ‘NCP engineering’

Organizations tasked with safely connecting their employees to the corporate network are under pressure to not only accommodate various devices, but also offer multi-platform support. In fact, analysts predict  that through 2017, 90% of enterprises will have two or more mobile operating systems to manage! Adding to this pressure is the recent onslaught of Windows 8-based systems in the enterprise, which means the demand for secure remote access solutions is following suit.

Heeding this call for adaptation, NCP engineering has upgraded its enterprise IPsec VPN client suite to offer compatibility with laptops and tablets running Windows 8, in particular, its Professional and Enterprise editions. The centrally managed remote access software also supports devices using Windows 7/Vista/XP 32-/64-bit.

NCP has also added several new security benefits to its enterprise IPsec VPN client, including prompting users via warning messages if they fail to log on to hotspots without established Wi-Fi connections. When this occurs, the software solution advises users on creating suitable connection profiles, and helps them determine if alternative network selections are necessary.

The NCP Secure Enterprise Client also includes the recently added Access Point Name (APN) management feature, which eliminates the need to manually update each device’s APN when switching out SIM cards from different mobile operators. For more information on the new product version and how NCP is meeting Windows users’ evolving remote access needs, check out the full press release here.

In today’s mobile workforce, millions of organizations are put at risk due to faulty or unsecure remote access connections. To rectify their security concerns and overcome the complexities of managing large-scale VPN rollouts, NCP engineering has released a new version of its Secure Enterprise Management (SEM) system.

The software provides unparalleled security with the new NCP Advanced Authentication, which enables powerful Two-Factor Authentication with a One-Time Password that users receive via SMS from the NCP Advanced Authentication Connector. This eliminates the need for enterprises to use other third-party solutions, instead enabling Two-Factor Authentication with only a mobile feature phone or smartphone.

On top of this, the SEM system offers a single point of network administration to control companies’ entire IPsec and SSL VPN networks, as well as full Network Access Control (NAC) management. It also supports the broadest range of end device platforms, including Windows 8/7/Vista/XP, Windows Mobile/Phone, Android, Mac OS X, Mac iOS, BlackBerry, Symbian and Linux.

 To learn more about today’s announcement, you can read the full release here.

Advanced_Auth

Screenshot of the Advanced Authentication

As BYOD continues to increase in prevalence, Apple devices are becoming more common in the workplace. On the heels of our recent announcement about the NCP Secure Enterprise Server’s integration with iOS products, we were wondering – what is your favorite iOS device? Don’t see yours listed below? Feel free to let us know what it is in the comments.

As indicated by your feedback in several of our polls, and as highlighted at Interop New York, more and more users are opting to access their company network via various devices. Of all the devices involved in the BYOD movement, Apple iOS products are some of the most popular. In response to this demand, the NCP Secure Enterprise VPN Server now integrates with Apple’s iOS, so IT administrators can perform certificate-based authentication to control network access of iPhones and iPads.

So, how does this work? Apple’s mobile device management (MDM) distributes various certificates to all authorized iOS devicies. When users establish VPN tunnels from their devices, the NCP Secure Enterprise VPN Server uses these certificates to determine what type of device the user is accessing the network with. This enables network administrators to, for example, allow a Mac OS X notebook full access rights, while limiting iOS devices to partial access to the central network. Also, users are unable to decipher or manipulate the certificates, significantly reducing the risk of certifications being duplicated for unauthorized devices. Security is, after all, one of the biggest concerns associated with BYOD.

Ultimately, with its iOS secure authentication, NCP enables IT administrators to use certificates to control assignment rights on these end devices – without interfering with the user-determined username and passwords. Want to view the entire, official announcement? Check it out here.

In part one of this two-part series, we explored the problem that many IPsec users face when trying to connect to their corporate network from the road, especially hotels. This being, some hotels block IPsec ports because of the misconception that SSL is universally employed.

So what’s the solution? Firstly, for security reasons, users should not deactivate the firewall or the proxy server. However, compelling a hotel guest to send or receive sensitive information via unsecured connections is no option either. Even using SSL is not a suitable for all situations, as SSL does not provide the same level of security as IPsec. And to further complicate matters, SSL only works with applications that are optimized for browser access.

However, there is a third option that combines the best of both worlds: NCP’s VPN Path Finder Technology. When a guest wants to establish a connection to his company network from a hotel, NCP’s Secure Client automatically recognizes if the company’s VPN gateway is not available via IPsec. In this case, the client software automatically switches to a modified IPsec protocol mode.This modified IPsec mode uses a TCP encapsulation and prefixes a SSL header. The IPsec client simulates a SSL connection via the standard HTTPS Port 443 and uses it to establish an IPsec tunnel to the company network.

The main advantage of this solution: there is no discernible change for users. They continue using all their regular authentication mechanisms — and reap the benefits of IPsec. Also, the corporate system administrators can enforce this security policy without having to make exceptions for single users who would undermine the company’s security concept. And finally, the hotel managers, too, profit from NCP’s VPN Path Finder Technology. Their guests are content because they are able to easily and securely access their company network, despite firewall and proxy server issues.